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Where We Are 1:50,000 Ordnance Survey Map

 

LIST OF LOCAL WORDS AND HILL NAMES
 
band
the ridge of a hill; from the Middle English bande
beck
a stream; from the Old Norse bekkr
bield
a shelter, protection; from the Old English beldo, courage
Blencathra
Probably from the Welsh blaen, summit, and cateir, chair, i.e. the chair-shaped mountain. Whilst it means much the same, I prefer it to the insipid Saddleback, the fell's other name, which hardly does justice to this magnificent eminence.
Brocken spectre
A shadow of the viewer cast by the sun onto cloud. It is often surrounded by coloured, rainbow-like lights (glories). Named after the highest of the Harz mountains where witches are said to gather on Walpurgis Night.
Cat Bells
the cat's den; from the Middle English belde a bield, or shelter
crag
a rough steep rock; derivation uncertain
dale
a valley; from the Old Norse dalr
fell
a mountain, or hill, or upland tract; from the Old Norse fjall, a rock
gill, or ghyll
a small ravine; from the Old Norse gil, a steep sided valley
how
a low hill; from the Old Norse haugr
knott
a craggy hill; from the Old Norse knutr
pike
a sharp-pointed hill; from the Old English pic, a spike
rake
a path up a hill or in a gully; from the Old Norse rak, a stripe
scar
a bare , craggy rock formation; from the Old Norse sker
scarth
a pass or gap in a ridge; from the Old Norse skarth
stickle
a sharp peak; from the Old Norse stikill
tarn
a small mountain lake; from the Old Norse tjorn
thwaite
a piece of land reclaimed from forest or wetlands; from the Old Norse thveit, a paddock
tup
an uncastrated ram; origin unknown
wether
a castrated ram; from the Old English wether